ENGLAND - The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England - Ian Mortimer

"As soon as you start to think of the past happening (as opposed to it having happened), a new way of conceiving history becomes possible ... You start to gain an inkling as to why people did this or that, and even why they believed things we find simply incredible." -- Ian Mortimer

The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England: A Handbook for Visitors to the Fourteenth Century does just that, taking a look at life in England several centuries ago, told as if the reader were preparing for an actual journey back in time, studying on what to do and how to survive in a vastly different world. It shows us that the past is not just something to be studied; it is also something to be lived.

Author and Medieval history expert Ian Mortimer (see About the Author below) turns our 21st century world and its entire understanding of history upside down by transporting readers to a jolly, squalid old England for a thorough survey of everyday 14th century life. His visitor's guide approach to popular history gives readers a seamless sense of being there and a clear view on Medieval life.

Whether you're a travel fan or history buff, take a step back in time to the smells, the sites, the attitudes of the time with The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England: A Handbook for Visitors to the Fourteenth Century. Almost makes you want to go back to school and take a Medieval England history class....almost.

Once your done with Medieval times, head on over to Elizabethan England for your next time travel.

And if you love this book, be sure to check out Related Items below, as well as our entire Places collection!

BOOK DESCRIPTION

  • Condition: New. Glued binding.
  • Edition: Paperback - Published 2009
  • Publisher: Vintage Publishing / London
  • ISBN-13: 978-1439112908
  • ISBN-10 1439112908
  • Pages: 344
  • Rating:★★★★ (See FAQs)
  • Ian Mortimer has BA, PhD and DLitt degrees in history from Exeter University and an MA in archive studies from University College London. From 1991 to 2003 he worked for Devon Record Office, Reading University, the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, and Exeter University. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society in 1998, and was awarded the Alexander Prize (2004) by the Royal Historical Society.

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